The GOP Wants to Pass Greater Liability Protections. Do Businesses Need Them?

“They have to show that the exposure caused the plaintiff to contract the coronavirus,” and that the business did nothing to prevent consumers from getting sick, says Robert Tauler, managing partner at Tauler Smith, a Los Angeles law firm specializing in commercial litigation. “That is a very, very difficult standard to meet,” he says, adding: “It would basically cut any lawsuit off at the knees.”

Read the full article on Inc.

Paper Magazine’s Instagram account disappeared on July 8 and a new lawsuit explains why

If anyone is wondering why Paper Magazine’s Instagram account disappeared, a new lawsuit helps to explain why.

In a lawsuit filed on Wednesday in California federal court, the magazine’s parent company ENTtech Media Group claims it has fallen victim to an alleged scheme by a group of photo companies allegedly weaponizing copyright claims to extract a settlement for roughly $1 million.

Click here to read full article on WWD.

Paper Magazine Broke the Internet, but What Happened to Its Instagram Account?

If anyone is wondering why Paper Magazine’s Instagram account disappeared, a new lawsuit helps to explain why.

In a lawsuit filed on Wednesday in California federal court, the magazine’s parent company ENTtech Media Group claims it has fallen victim to an alleged scheme by a group of photo companies allegedly weaponizing copyright claims to extract a settlement for roughly $1 million.

Two of these companies — Okularity Inc. and BackGrid USA Inc. — did not respond to requests for comment. Splash News and Picture Agency LLC declined to comment, while contact information for Xposure Photo Agency Inc. could not be located.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life.

Copyright Troll Richard Liebowitz Drops Case After Suing On Behalf Of The Wrong Party And Trying To Swap Plaintiffs

Why oh why do people still hire copyright troll Richard Liebowitz? There are just so many stories of him messing up cases and getting scolded by judges, you’d think that people would think twice. But then, yet another story of Liebowitz messing up comes to light. The latest is a real doozy. 

Click here to read full article on TechDirt.com.

Pier59 sues Milk Studios for alleged safety code violations

Fashion studio Pier59 has sued a rival photography studio claiming that it has violated safety codes in its Meatpacking district studio spaces in a Google-owned building.

Pier59 Studios — owned by Italian Prince Federico Pignatelli della Leonessa — claims in a new Manhattan Supreme Court lawsuit that Milk Studios is doing film shoots without proper permitting in its offices on the 2nd, 8th and penthouse floors of the Sky Line adjacent 450 West 15th St. building.

Read more at PageSix.com.

Judge orders co-founder of Puls Technologies Inc. to appear for deposition in fraud lawsuit

Itai Hirsch, co-founder and President of Puls, faces lawsuit alleging he defrauded an early-stage shareholder out of equity. Trial is set for September.

I am glad Itai Hirsch will finally be deposed. So far, Puls Technologies has been very dodgy in this case, which may be why they are on their third set of lawyers.”

— Attorney Robert Tauler

SAN DIEGO, CALIF., USA, July 22, 2019 /EINPresswire.com/ — Puls Technologies Inc. co-founder and President Itai Hirsch was ordered to appear for deposition next month as a civil lawsuit accusing him and the company of fraud heads towards a Sept. 6 trial.

“I am glad Itai Hirsch will finally be deposed,” Attorney Robert Tauler said.

Puls and Hirsch are accused of defrauding an early-stage shareholder out of millions of dollars, equivalent to a 5 percent stake in the company, according to the lawsuit, filed in October 2017 in San Diego County Superior Court.

San Diego Superior Court Judge Gregory Pollack on July 12 ordered Hirsch to appear for his deposition. The move comes after Puls Technologies in late June announced the appointment of new CEO Mitch Galbraith.

Puls Technologies also shuffled its legal counsel after the ruling, making this the third AmLaw 200 firm to represent Puls during the pendency of the lawsuit. “It is rare that a corporate client like Puls Technologies switches lawyers during a case of this importance, but it is even more rare to switch twice,” Tauler said. 

The lawsuit alleges that Hirsch held secret funding talks with Sequoia Capital Israel Ltd. that were not disclosed to the plaintiff. The fraud claim alleges that the plaintiff was dismissed from the company under false pretenses just weeks before Puls (then known as Cellsavers and based in San Diego) publicly announced $3 million in funding in December 2015. Altogether, Puls has now raised over $90 million in funding — thus dramatically increasing the value of the plaintiff’s stock, according to the lawsuit.

Hirsch kept the funding deal under wraps so that he could keep the plaintiff’s promised equity for himself and his new investors, while taking advantage of the plaintiff’s work — which was crucial in justifying the start-up’s valuation, the lawsuit alleges. (San Diego Superior Court case number: 37-2017-00041466-CU-BC-CTL)

Puls provides in-home repair and installation for electronic devices and smart homes, like a Lyft for technicians. Last year it was named one of LinkedIn’s top start-ups to watch.

Read the press release at EIN Newsdesk.

House Fire Prompts $1 Million Dispute With Airbnb

Eight Airbnb guests were staying in the three-story house that overlooked the Sonoma Valley. Fortunately, all eight escaped the flames unharmed. Minutes after they made it out, the burning house came crashing down.

The Sonoma Valley Fire and Rescue fire marshal’s report on the incident notes non-code electric work near a wooden outdoor deck. Investigators also noted two of the Airbnb renters admitted they were smoking on that deck, about an hour before the fire started:

– It was possible that one of them threw cigarette butts over the deck railing or dropped some on [the] deck.

Ultimately, the fire’s cause was declared “undetermined” by the fire marshal. But no matter what ignited the flames, the house was a total loss.

The $1 million question

After the fire, the homeowners obtained a contractor’s estimate to rebuild. The estimate: $1.8 million.

The homeowners — who are remaining anonymous — told NBC Bay Area they received a $600,000 payment from their property insurance provider, but not the $1 million they were counting on from Airbnb. Its “Host Guarantee” offers homeowners “Property damage protection of up to $1 million for every host and every listing—at no additional cost.”

Consumer attorney Robert Tauler says promises like the Airbnb Host Guarantee aren’t always easy to redeem.

“They don’t just write checks for a million bucks without kicking the tires, for sure,” Tauler said.

Tauler specializes in holding tech companies accountable for their advertising. He says simple assurances spelled out on an app look easy, but putting those promises into practice — like after a fire — might meet resistance.

“Frequently, their acts are inconsistent with their words,” Tauler said. “That’s a real serious problem.”

Click here to read the full article and view the segment aired on NBC Bay Area.

Coco Rocha loses modeling agency battle

Coco Rocha has gotten herself caught in the middle of a model war.

The cover girl, who took a management and ownership stake in Nomad Mgmt two years ago, just lost a battle with Federico Pignatelli, the owner of Industry Model Group and Pier59 Studios. Pignatelli sued Nomad after Giovanni Bernardi left Industry’s Los Angeles office after just six months to help create Nomad Los Angeles.

“It is clear that Bernardi only took the position at Industry to obtain trade secrets, confidential information, employees and resources for his own venture,” Pignatelli’s lawyer Robert Tauler wrote in an LA Superior Court suit.

Click here to view full article on Page Six.

Doping experts contradict some of Clemson’s theories on drug test results

Medical experts this week cast doubt on some of the theories laid out by Clemson as to how three football players, including star defensive tackle Dexter Lawrence, tested positive for the banned substance ostarine prior to the College Football Playoff.

In a press conference before the Cotton Bowl last month, Clemson coach Dabo Swinney said the drug could have come from any source. The players were ruled ineligible for the Tigers’ Cotton Bowl matchup with Notre Dame and the national championship game, which Clemson won in a one-sided victory over Alabama.

Click here to read the full article on The Post and Couriers.

Athletes Falling Victim to Production Contamination

Clemson losing hope that Dexter Lawrence can play vs. Notre Dame: ‘You feel heartbroken for him’

Robert Tauler, a trial lawyer for the Los Angeles firm Tauler Smith, told the Tribune that bits of ostarine can end up in NCAA-approved supplements such as protein powder if factory workers are not careful about product “runoff” or diligent about cleaning machinery.

“We’ve seen it happen a lot,” Tauler said. “Athletes’ careers are in jeopardy, and it’s really a travesty. The concept that they would take (ostarine) and risk everything is ridiculous; the effect is not even close to that of steroids.”

Read full article on chicagotribune.com.